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New York, Whitney Museum of American Art: “Project for a New American Century” by Josh Kline.. and More

USA_New York

Whitney Museum of American Art: “Project for a New American Century” by Josh Kline

Josh Kline, still from ‘Adaptation,’ 2019–22. Collection of the artist; courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York. ©Josh Kline

The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York presents Josh Kline’s (b. 1979) solo exhibition “Project for a New American Century” through August 13.

Bringing together works from the past decade, this is the first U.S. museum survey of the artist’s work.

Through his art, Kline questions how new technologies are changing human life in the 21st century, with a particular focus on issues of labor and class. He examines how social and political issues such as climate change, automation, disease, and the erosion of democracy affect the working population today. He often utilizes the technologies, practices, and forms he scrutinizes—digitization, data collection, image manipulation, 3D printing, commercial and political advertising, and productivity-enhancing substances—aiming them back at themselves.

The new work ‘Adaptation (2019-2022)’ addresses the issue of the climate crisis. Based on science fiction scenarios, the installation and video works tell the story of a hot and dangerous future, with essential workers left behind on the horizon to clean up the mess. In this era of escalating crises, Kline’s work offers a visceral warning and calls for a more human future.

USA_Santa Fe

Santa Fe’s Center for Contemporary Arts Closes Permanently

The Center for Contemporary Arts Santa Fe. Credit: CCA

On April 6, the Center for Contemporary Arts of Santa Fe (CCA), a historic art museum in operation since 1970, announced its permanent closure. The CCA was one of the few contemporary art institutions that presented art houses, indie, and foreign films. Until recently, it had programs that provided opportunities for underrepresented artists. Artists and visitors expressed concern following the news of the closure.

In its official announcement, the organization cited the impact of the pandemic, changes in the structure of film distribution, and long-standing funding problems as reasons for the closure, but the Commission’s interviews revealed several other problems. As a nonprofit organization that relied on private donations, the CCA was unable to use them autonomously to meet the needs of the institution because private donations were tied to specific programs or exhibitions. In addition, the CCA had been struggling to establish its identity over the past 19 years, with a new director every two to three years. Finally, Danyelle Means (Oglala Lakota), who became director in July 2021, was the first woman of Native American descent to serve as director. Since her arrival, the institution had hosted Native American-focused exhibits that, according to an interviewee, white men, who make up the majority of the patron base, had been unwilling to support.

USA_New York

Jeffrey Deitch: Solo Exhibition by Kennedy Yanko “Humming on Life"

Installation view of Kennedy Yanko’s “Humming on Life” at Jeffrey Deitch, New York (2023). Courtesy of Kennedy Yanko and Jeffrey Deitch; Photo by Genevieve Hanson; Credit: Jeffrey Deitch

Jeffrey Deitch New York presents Kennedy Yanko’s (b. 1988) solo exhibition “Humming on Life” through April 22. Yanko combines sheets of painted latex, which she calls “paint skin,” with discarded pieces of metal. She recreates color palettes based on the rust and weathered, tarnished hues of the metal and paints them back onto the object. The colors of the rusted metal become ornate and painterly. Although she creates large three-dimensional works, the artist considers herself a painter. Though heavy and difficult to store, Yanko’s works are popular at art fairs for their mesmerizing images.

The exhibition also features “Illuminating Sound,” composed by Samuel Kareem, which takes its motif from the sounds of water and metal from Yanko’s working process. Yanko felt the livingness of her material from the sound of the water falling on the metal.

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