K-ARTNOW

Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
previous arrowprevious arrow
next arrownext arrow
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide

White Cube Hong Kong Presents 4 Painters of Asian Origin: A Sense of Ambiguity of the Immigrant Experience.. and More

Hong Kong

White Cube Hong Kong Presents 4 Painters of Asian Origin: A Sense of Ambiguity of the Immigrant Experience

Installation view of “New Moroism” at White Cube Hong Kong, Hong Kong, 2023. Credit: White Cube

White Cube Hong Kong presents the group show “New Moroism” through September 9. This exhibition is part of White Cube’s “Inside the White Cube” series, which aims to show selected young contemporary artists who have not previously exhibited with the gallery.

Participating artists Michael Ho (b. 1991), Chris Huen Sin Kan (b. 1991), Timothy Lai (b. 1987), and Su Yu-Xin (b. 1991) are all young artists of Asian origin in their 30s.

The exhibition counts ambiguity as the common thread that runs through the works of the four figurative painters, hazy and blurred vision of the content or the form of images, which the show believes reveals a new approach and sense of trans-regional shifts and migration. In the exhibition’s title, “New Moroism,” Moroism refers to the “mōrōtai” style that emerged in the late Meiji period in Japan. “Moro” means “vague” or “faint.”

Austrailia_Melbourne

“CHAGALL” at the Jewish Museum of Australia

Installation view of ‘CHAGALL’ at Jewish Museum of Australia, St. Kilda, 2023. Photo: Marie-Luise Skibbe

The Jewish Museum of Australia (Gandel Centre of Judaica) presents “CHAGALL” through December 10. The show features Marc Chagall (1887-1985)’s works from ‘Poèmes (1968),’ ‘Lithographs (1960),’ ‘Les Fables de la Fontaine (1926-1928),’ and ‘Bible (the 1950s-1960s)’ series, as well as Chagall’s poetry and immersive spaces inspired by his works. The show is a nod to the institution’s first major exhibition in 1995, “Chagall and the Bible.”

Chagall established himself as a master of the 20th century by combining the Jewish folkloric painterly roots of his native Russia and the Parisian fauvist, cubist, and expressionist styles to accomplish a unique visual language. His concerns were universal and timeless themes such as joy, love, and melancholy.

In conjunction with the Chagall exhibition, the Museum presents the inaugural show of the Contemporary Australian Artist Commission, a program established to support artists inspired by Chagall’s life, themes, and works. Paintings by the first recipient, Yvette Coppersmith (b. 1980), are on view during the Chagall exhibition.

Japan_Tokyo

Photographers from Tokyo and Paris, Motohashi Seiichi and Robert Doisneau at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum

Motohashi Seiichi, ‘Haboro Coal Mine Haboro, Hokkaido.’ From “The Coral Mine,” 1968. © Motohashi Seiichi

Tokyo Photographic Art Museum (TOP MUSEUM) presents “Motohashi Seiichi & Robert Doisneau: Chemins croisés- Narrative Passages” through September 24. The exhibition features Japanese photographer and documentary filmmaker Motohashi Seiichi (b. 1940) and leading French contemporary photographer Robert Doisneau (1912-1994).

Motohashi photographed people in Tokyo, while Doisneau photographed people in Paris and its suburbs. The exhibition focuses on the resonance of both photographers’ gazes beyond time and region. Coal mines, circuses, and markets are common in their work. Having experienced the turmoil caused by World War II, they captured the strength and richness of the lives of people living with integrity amid struggle, as well as the disappearing scenes of cities.

Editor’s Picks

Most Views

Editor’s Picks

Most Views

World Art View
Post Views: 477