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Cleveland, Paintings Hung on Home Walls, Antwoine Washington’s “Come Home with Me” at Gallery 2602.. and More

USA_Cleveland

Cleveland, Paintings Hung on Home Walls, Antwoine Washington’s “Come Home with Me” at Gallery 2602

Installation view of Antwoine Washington’s “Come Home with Me” at Gallery 2602, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, 2023. Washington’s Paintings from left to right: ‘472 Valencia (2022),’ ‘The Great Dismal Swamp (2022),’ ‘A Burning Love (2022)’; Photo Credit: La Tanya S. Autry/Hyperallergic

Gallery 2602 in Cleveland is a gallery at home. Since 2022, Deidre McPherson and Thea Spittle have operated a private home as an art gathering space for the community to participate in and as a gallery to showcase and sell artworks. Visitors can visit during open hours after reservation or make private appointments. Stipple founded Gallery 2602 after curating outdoor projects by local artists in the garden of her parent’s mansion from 2014 to 2019.

Gallery 2602’s inaugural exhibition is “Come Home with Me,” a solo show by Antwoine Washington. Antwoine has been participating in public artistic activities beyond institutional museums, including making public murals, exhibitions in community centers, and local art education. He shares with the owners of Gallery 2602 interests in alternative exhibition spaces outside the white cubes. In this exhibition, Antwoine presents paintings that oscillate between his personal experience as a black man and collective memory. The works on display include self-portraits, family members, ancestors, black abolitionists, and anonymous black people.

Mexico_Mexico City

At kurimanzutto, Mexico City, Daniel Guzmán’s Drawings and Structures Are Inspired by the Narrative of I Ching

Installation view of Daniel Guzmán’s “The man who should be dead: you must go in to get out” at kurimanzutto, Mexico City, 2023. Courtesy Daniel Guzmán and kurimanztto. Photo: Gerardo Landa/ Eduaro López (GLR Estudio), 2023.

Mexico City’s kurimanztto gallery presents “The man who should be dead: You must come in to get out,” Mexican artist Daniel Guzmán’s (b. 1964) solo show through July 28. The show features a selection of the artist’s drawings from 2017.

Guzmán’s practice takes reference from music criticism, science fiction, narrative literature, essays, and poetry. In particular, the Book of Changes I Ching, the ancient Chinese scripture, and its view on astrology was a major influence on this exhibition.

Guzmán built four wooden structures and installed works inside and outside of them to spatially unfold the images and the narratives within. The four sections are titled “Killing the Father,” “Killing the Children,” “Burying the Dead,” and “Life Signals,” respectively. The artist calls his structures “Field essays of temporary narrative concentration.”

USA_New York

CCS Bard in New York Presents Sculptor Erika Verzutti’s Solo Show “New Moons”

Erika Verzutti, ‘Flat Grandpa,’ 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Andrew Kreps Gallery, New York.

The CCS Bard (Center for Curatorial Studies) at Bard College, New York, presents “Erika Verzutti: New Moons” through October 15. Erika Verzutti (b. 1971) is a Brazilian sculptor whose uniquely shaped sculptures with wide-ranging references have been part of leading institutional shows.

Her subjects of interest include plants, humans, animals, everyday objects, spiritual beings, and art and architectural history. In particular, the moon in the title symbolizes for the artist the life stages and cycles that a person or entity goes through, as well as a planetary perspective as part of a universe larger than Earth. Like the moon, the artist attempts to take distance and view Earth’s order, hierarchy, and categorization of knowledge from an unfamiliar perspective.

The exhibition presents more than 60 wall works and sculptures created by the artist over the past 15 years using bronze, clay, aluminum, paper-mâché, wax, and Styrofoam. The works share the artist’s recurring motifs, such as egg and bead shapes, and the fingerprints and tool marks of her hands. Her sculptures are duplicated or transformed into multiple versions, forming a ‘family’ and revealing the artist’s personal relationship with objects and materials.

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